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Mcweeny, Jennifer, , . Liberating Anger, Embodying Knowledge: A Comparative Study of Maria Lugones and Zen Master Hakuin
2010, Hypatia 25 (2):295 – 315.
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Added by: Clotilde Torregrossa, Contributed by: Corbin Covington

Abstract: This paper strengthens the theoretical ground of feminist analyses of anger by explaining how the angers of the oppressed are ways of knowing. Relying on insights created through the juxtaposition of Latina feminism and Zen Buddhism, I argue that these angers are special kinds of embodied perceptions that surface when there is a profound lack of fit between a particular bodily orientation and its framing world of sense. As openings to alternative sensibilities, these angers are transformative, liberatory, and deeply epistemological.

Comment: [This is a stub entry. Please add your comments to help us expand it]

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Sherman, Nancy, , . Virtue and a Warrior’s Anger
2007, In Rebecca L. Walker & P. J. Ivanhoe (eds.), Working Virtue: Virtue Ethics and Contemporary Moral Problems. Oxford University Press.
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Added by: John Baldari, Contributed by:

Comment: This text is best used as additional reading in ethics and virtue. This chapter is specifically useful in philosophy of war for discussion of effects of war on combatants.

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Srinivasan, Amia, , . The Aptness of Anger
2018, Journal of Political Philosophy, 26 (2):123-144
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Added by: Clotilde Torregrossa, Contributed by: Lizzy Ventham

Abstract: This paper argues that anger has an important role in political life. By not recognising this, we risk neglecting groups for whom anger is appropriate, and who have never been allowed to be angry.

Comment: This paper is a great conversation starter about the place of anger in political philosophy. It provides original arguments that can go against a lot of students’ initial intuitions on the topic, so can be a great way to start discussion and debate. I’d use it on classes on politics, feminism, or applied ethics.

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