Blue print
Dickie, Bonnie. Hollow Water
2000, NFB. 48 min. Canada.
Expand entry
Added by: Sonja Dobroski and Quentin Pharr
Abstract: This documentary profiles the tiny Ojibway community of Hollow Water on the shores of Lake Winnipeg as they deal with an epidemic of sexual abuse in their midst. The offenders have left a legacy of denial and pain, addiction and suicide. The Manitoba justice system was unsuccessful in ending the cycle of abuse, so the community of Hollow Water took matters into their own hands. The offenders were brought home to face justice in a community healing and sentencing circle. Based on traditional practices, this unique model of justice reunites families and heals both victims and offenders. The film is a powerful tribute to one community's ability to heal and create change.

Comment: [This is a stub entry. Please add your comments to help us expand it]

Share on Facebook Share on LinkedIn Share by Email
Full text Blue print
Maracle, Lee. I Am Woman: A Native Perspective on Sociology and Feminism
2002, Press Gang Publishers, Canada.
Expand entry
Added by: Sonja Dobroski and Quentin Pharr
Publisher’s Note: I Am Woman represents my personal struggle with womanhood, culture, traditional spiritual beliefs and political sovereignty, written during a time when that struggle was not over. My original intention was to empower Native women to take to heart their own personal struggle for Native feminist being. The changes made in this second edition of the text do not alter my original intention. It remains my attempt to present a Native woman's sociological perspective on the impacts of colonialism on us, as women, and on my self personally.

Comment: [This is a stub entry. Please add your comments to help us expand it]

Share on Facebook Share on LinkedIn Share by Email
Full text Blue print
Waziyatawin. What Does Justice Look Like?: The Struggle for Liberation in Dakota Homeland
2008, Living Justice Press.
Expand entry
Added by: Sonja Dobroski and Quentin Pharr
Publisher’s Note: During the past 150 years, the majority of Minnesotans have not acknowledged the immense and ongoing harms suffered by the Dakota People ever since their homelands were invaded over 200 years ago. Many Dakota people say that the wounds incurred have never healed, and it is clear that the injustices: genocide, ethnic cleansing, mass executions, death marches, broken treaties, and land theft; have not been made right. The Dakota People paid and continue to pay the ultimate price for Minnesota's statehood.This book explores how we can embark on a path of transformation on the way to respectful coexistence with those whose ancestral homeland this is. Doing justice is central to this process. Without justice, many Dakota say, healing and transformation on both sides cannot occur, and good, authentic relations cannot develop between our Peoples. Written by Wahpetunwan Dakota scholar and activist Waziyatawin of Pezihutazizi Otunwe, What Does Justice Look Like? offers an opportunity now and for future generations to learn the long-untold history and what it has meant for the Dakota People. On that basis, the book offers the further opportunity to explore what we can do between us as Peoples to reverse the patterns of genocide and oppression, and instead to do justice with a depth of good faith, commitment, and action that would be genuinely new for Native and non-Native relations.

Comment: [This is a stub entry. Please add your comments to help us expand it]

Share on Facebook Share on LinkedIn Share by Email
Full text Read free Blue print
Yazzie, Robert. “Life Comes from it”: Navajo Justice Concepts
1994, New Mexico Law Review, (24)2, 175-90.
Expand entry
Added by: Sonja Dobroski and Quentin Pharr
Abstract: This paper offers a comparison between Navajo conceptions of law and justice based on the community's experiences to those of Anglo-european law and justice.

Comment: [This is a stub entry. Please add your comments to help us expand it]

Share on Facebook Share on LinkedIn Share by Email
Can’t find it?
Contribute the texts you think should be here and we’ll add them soon!